1005. Blood Waters of Dr. Z (1971)

I’m reminded of Dr. Z. :notes:"These are a few of his Favorite Things!!!:notes:

I agree it was pretty gross. But I still got a lot of comedic satisfaction from it.

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Eh?

Finally someone didn’t forget to bring the crackers!

It’s driving me mad, like ZAAT mad, not having any crackers!

Just so long as they aren’t Chicken In A Biskits. Small portions of those, only, for the boy at the end of the table.

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This one never leaves much of an impression on me. Some of it is gross, most is just boring. The fishing host segment is fun.

It’s kind of weird that the bad guy has no spoken lines at all. We just get his occasional voiceover narration.

“Sargassum: the weed of deceit!” is the most memorable part of the movie and it doesn’t really have anything to do with the movie at all. It’s not even accurate for the point he’s trying to make. What he’s saying is that there’s a predatory fish which hides in the sargassum. The sargassum is not a weed and is not being deceitful. And it’s not like there aren’t land animals that hide in the bushes with skin or fur patterns to help them blend in. Nor do we see that fish again. The whole thing is a complete non-sequitor.

Also, what is it with evil scientists trying to take over the human world by creating fish monsters? So impractical.

The other thing that stands out in the movie (I mean, besides the brown tint, the casual racism, and the sexism) is the scene where the guy is walking through the swamp, gets bitten by a snake, grabs it, throws it off screen, and falls over. Because that was not in the script. That was a very real snake bite. They just kept rolling, let him limp to shore, cleaned the wound, and made him limp through the rest of the film.

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I just noticed on Thursday’s rewatch that somehow the villain’s German by the time the movie’s over, too. He sure wasn’t at the beginning. WTF?

No one should be surprised that I only noticed this now, given how seldom I return to this episode.

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His backstory is that he was doing scientific experimentation on humans in Germany from 1938-1943, then changed his name and moved to the US. He found himself very frustrated that apparently that’s considered unethical here, so now he’s out to get revenge on the scientists who wouldn’t let him continue his research.

So… they didn’t know he was German until they did some digging.

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It really is a bit of a dull movie, with very little to work with apart from the rambling monologue. I think it only works because this was a late episode, when the old team was at their peak and could extract every bit of comedy potential from a film. I’ve always kind of wondered if this was a late replacement for another film that fell through.

We’ve had a brainstorming session about this.

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But the voiceovers don’t hint at any of that. He has no accent and he never references being from another country. :roll_eyes:

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Yes. That was fun. Good thread. I stand by my answer to the question there.

His Nazi past is one of the film’s big reveals. They didn’t want us to know sooner.

From his perspective, it’s also somewhat irrelevant. He’s been living in the US for years, and likely took pains to hide his accent and his past, as being a Nazi scientist is generally frowned upon. The Nazis let him do his experiments, so he has no grudge there. He has a few goals now: To take revenge on the American scientists who got in his way, to prove to the people who laughed at and ostracized him that he knows what he’s doing, and to be the progenitor of a race of fish people who can control other fish and somehow use that to subjugate humanity. That he left Germany a quarter century ago just doesn’t matter to him at this point.

The locals did not know, either. They just know he’s a scientist who moved in from somewhere else to do fish research and he seems kind of kooky and they’d just rather have nothing to do with him.

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Are you sure that all this was planned by the filmmakers from the start, or did they just drink a lot and have a long-term memory deficit?

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No, I can’t be sure. It seems like something they had to have planned out, since there’s a subplot (some of which I believe got cut for time in the episode) of her researching him and getting background on him through short wave radio and it does make some sense of his willingness to do human experimentation.

On the other hand, if he was working in a lab in 1938 and it’s now 1971, you’d think he’d be a little older than the guy we see at the beginning of the movie.

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It was his name that threw them off. Kurt is the name you give to the good guy German who will let you hide in his basement and won’t rat you out to the Gestapo.

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So, uh, opening host segment with the tobacco made me almost want to throw up.

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Still hilarious, though.

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Bleh - this episode just didn’t do much for me. The movie itself is soul-grindingly dull and even the okay riffing just isn’t enough to make me want to sit through this grimy, bleak, bafflingly odd film that is so very 1970s that it makes me want to self immolate. Every person in the movie is so dumb, and the shambling, practically immobile “antagonist” is entirely dependent on random chance and victim cooperation on the level of the Creeping Terror. BOO!

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“This is the Gerald Ford of monsters!”

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