208. Lost Continent (1951)

“Well, in regards to today’s movie, I’m just going to say Rock Climbing.” “Just sit right back and you’ll hear a tale…” “A tale of a fateful trip…” “That started from a flying plane crashing down below…” “The major is a most romantic man…” “His pilot not too keen…” “Four guys flew with on the plane that day…” “Not knowing they would crash…” “Not knowing they would CRAAASH…” “It’s called Lost Continent and I’m very excited about it because it has Cesar Romero, Hugh Beaumont, a big lizard, the guy from The Danny Thomas Show, and oh did I mention Rock Climbing?” Pep Talk, Rock Climbing, Mobile Treadmill, The Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse, The Explorers, Cool Thing, Padding. “Lost Continent? I lost my keys once, but that’s ridiculous”, “Do not remove this tag under penalty of law!”, “Aw, I could have had a V8.” “Aw, seen it” or “Top of the World, Ma!”?

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Mobile Treadmill.

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The Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse.

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2014 Turkey Day Intro to Lost Continent (1951).

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Crash Landing.

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The Attack of the Red Herring.

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Rock Climbing.

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Best of 208.

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Roping a Wild Rock Isn’t Easy.

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Trailer to Lost Continent (1951).

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What can you say but rock climbing. Rock climbing, BruceLeePullen. This raises an interesting question: what MSTied movie has the most padding? This one’s got to be up there.

This one’s pretty good for an early episode, from what I remember, but the best part might be Hugh Beaumont, Horseman of the Apocalypse. Such a nice guy.

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I didn’t need to be sold on MST3K, but if I did, this one would’ve done it. I’m sure it was one of the first episodes I saw—this was back when Comedy Central ran the show constantly—and while I can’t swear that I’ve ever re-watched it, the sketches, “rock climbing” and Hugh Beaumont are forever seared into my memory, to where I reference them even today.

“Would someone please tell the director about compressing time through editing?”

Oh, how often that phrase comes in handy.

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Rock climbing indeed. There are other distinctive traits possessed by this film, such as all the 1950s and 1960s television personalities like Hugh Beaumont and Cesar Romero. But it’s the lengthy and tedious rock climbing sequence that sticks in everyone’s craw. But why rock climbing? You see, a rocket launch went awry and disappeared over the South Pacific. So, a team of scientists and Air Force personnel are sent to locate it and recover the flight data. When they arrive in the area, a local tells them of the rocket landing in a plateau on the island. And hence the rock climbing.

Unfortunately, it appears to stymie Joel and the Bots, whose wailing in agony I find as grating as the rock climbing, if not more so. It’s fortunate that there were so many familiar faces on the screen to inspire some more palatable riffs.

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There are things in life I never wished to see. One of them was Sid Melton’s naked butt. Alas…

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This may have been one of the first episodes I saw. We didn’t have cable, but a friend did and he recorded Turkey Day one year and gave us the tapes. “Rock Climbing” became a catchphrase in our house when I was writing college papers and professors wanted 20 pages (when 5-10 would usually do to get my point across).

Mother: How is your paper coming?

Me: Slow.

Mother: How much rock climbing are you adding?

Me. Lots.

So thank you MST. :smiley:

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These hills are crawling with Goldax.

Lost Continent is one of those movies where I suspect that budget created the perfect storm which resulted in a need for excessive padding of the film. It would have made far more sense to greatly compress the Rock Climbing™ part of the movie and instead spend a lot more time on the part which was actually more interesting (uh - Dinosaurs!?). But I expect that the stop motion work was a lot more expensive than just plunking down a camera and having the cast walk past it while bellyaching. Hence, we got a movie that was 20% introduction & setup, 60% Rock Climbing™, and 20% dinosaurs and denouement.

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Yeah that’s one thing that always struck me as odd. They have this great “Lost World” premise that they barely use and instead waste the viewer’s time with rock climbing. It is probably a combination of budget, effects and writing that lead to a terminally dull movie

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Look, Paramount needs a second feature to siphon profits away from When Worlds Collide and this fits the bill, see?

It’s perfect!

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They almost did When Worlds Collide for MST3K: The Movie. It’s not quite as goofy as This Island Earth, but I think I would have liked it more. It can also be edited down a lot more easily. The editing of This Island Earth really ruined the story.

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This Island Earth is a fun movie. When Worlds Collide is a much beloved classic[1]. I would certainly have factored that in to my decision-making when thinking of how I would best introduce the world to my show.

The book When Worlds Collide is actually really good, too. (The sequel, After Worlds Collide is a weird, jingoistic paean to '30s nationalism/tribalism/fascism.)


  1. I may be overstating this, but it’s always the impression I had when growing up. It was a popular double-feature with War of the Worlds and I actually preferred it to that film as a kid. ↩︎

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