Astronomy events coming to a sky near you!

I just hope it’s not cloudy wherever I wind up. Last time it was completely overcast where I was and all I could see was it getting dark early.

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Ah, that’s a shame! You’re due for better luck this time. And it’ll be longer too. For 2017 we went to Ft Campbell, Kentucky, and it was a perfect clear day; totality around 2 1/2 minutes. This one should have totality of nearly 4 1/2 minutes near the TX/MX border, and over 3 min even up in New England.

In 2017 I agonized for WEEKS over historical weather data trying to figure out where it was least likely to be cloudy before finally throwing up my hands and acknowledging that it was just up to fate.

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Last time, I picked a hotel outside the zone (Springfield IL), as they were charging normal rates and I had the option of going anywhere between the middle of Missouri to southern Illinois depending on where the best chance of getting clear skies. Wound up in Steeleville Illinois, slightly off the midpoint of the eclipse line, but still 2+ minutes of totality.

It was one of the most amazing things I’ve ever seen. Partial eclipses are nothing compared to the real thing. See it if you can, it’s totally worth it.

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That happened to me twice: Cook Islands 2010, and Cairns 2012. Fortunately got to Jackson City, MI for 2017; a location I picked based on the track: as close to the midpoint of the track as I could organise.

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It’s supposedly going to be perfect for viewing right here in Terre Haute, Indiana, but knowing Indiana when it comes to astronomical events, it will probably be total cloud cover on the day in question.

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My first and only total solar eclipse was the “part 1” of this “big X” eclipse pair. I plan on going to “part 2”, probably near Fredericksburg, TX.

The small town of Gallatin, TN (just northeast of Nashville) had a nice event in a public park. They even disabled the park lights (except in the restroom pavilion). It was hot, then amazing, then bright, then lots of traffic leaving.

Here’s a profile image I made years ago, with two photos to compare prior to and during. I didn’t have a nice camera, but a NASA photo showed what it looked like to me, sort of like silky sheets of solar corona around the eclipsed Sun. There’s more to the experience than photos can capture, though.

Tip: If the weather goes well you may be baking under the hot sun for hours. Read up on what to bring. Last time I should have brought more ice and variety of cold drinks, and also a source of shade.

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Definitely NE Ohio! If I can’t see the eclipse, at least I’ll get another stash of the best chips on the planet!

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Last one, the path of totality went right over my house. This time, I’ll have to drive to get there, but I can. I’m planning on either driving down and back in the same day or else driving to a place outside the path of totality but close-ish to it and staying in a hotel and then driving back.

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The 2017 eclipse wasn’t total here in Denver (I think we were somewhere around 90% though). Anyway, the strangest part was at the moment of our “totality” all of the birds stopped chirping and everything just went silent in the yard. Very eerie and very cool.

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Which is proof that birds are, fundamentally, stupid.

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I was living in Nashville in 2017 and would have had a great view except for the cloud cover that showed up just as the eclipse started and stuck around until well after totality. So bummed—had been waiting on that one since elementary school.

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Yeah I was considering Indianapolis mostly because I’ve never been there. But I wonder if TX might have a better shot at clear skies.

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I’m surprised to hear that – Ft Campbell’s only an hour away from Nashville and we had no clouds at all!

I’m trying NOT to go nuts about predicting the weather like I did last time, but since I’m in CA anywhere I go is going to be a long plane flight and a jacked-up-price hotel, so my need to exercise total control over the uncontrollable is hard to fight.

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Catch the Moon Phases of 2024 :full_moon: :waning_gibbous_moon: :last_quarter_moon: :waning_crescent_moon: :new_moon: :waxing_crescent_moon: :first_quarter_moon: :waxing_gibbous_moon: :full_moon:
Northern Hemisphere


Southern Hemisphere

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The one disappointment is that they didn’t put some kind of brief corona around the Moon on April 8. :smiley:

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Not sure why we needed separate graphics for northern and southern hemispheres; it’s the same moon — one view is just the other rotated 180°.

Still, I remember listening to a radio broadcast years back where the DJ was well aware that the show was going out worldwide, so when he mentioned a few times that it was “a full moon tonight” he always added “…in the northern hemisphere”.

I can’t believe we haven’t resurrected this thread for next week’s eclipse.

I’m trying not to react every time I see it, but I get sad whenever someone say “98% sounds good enough to me!” Let me put it this way: let’s say you’re 100 feet from a cliff edge. If you go 60 feet forward you’ll see some things you wouldn’t otherwise. Same if you go 98 feet forward. But if you go 100 feet forward, what you experience will not be anything like the person who went 98 feet forward.

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If you go 101 feet forward, you’ll see something you won’t experience again for the rest of your life.

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As for me, I long ago decided 99.9% is fine because I weighed it against dealing with crowds. My sister lives just outside totality, and we’d rather have a nice quiet moment in her backyard than dealing with traffic.

Maybe I’ll smudge my glasses so I get the corona effect.

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Hence the reason I’m going somewhere… clear?

Probably my last chance to see*, and I do not want to miss it. I’ve seen partials several times, and no end of lunar eclipses. But everyone says the same, so I’m going to saddle up the truck and go find clear weather.

  • Last Chance to See is a fine book, but completely off topic. I recommend it to your attention.
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