General All Purpose Disney Movies thread

Enter here for all such discussion about various Disney flicks.

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Bedknobs and Broomsticks is still pretty good for a musical partially made of Poppins leftovers.

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That’s one of the few “classic” Disney films I’ve never seen — and I’ve seen The Black Cauldron. I’ll have to make an effort to watch it soon.

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I guess it’s not bad, but I saw it as a child when it came out and had also seen Mary Poppins when it came out, and I remember being pretty disappointed by Bedknobs and Broomsticks.

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It’s a movie where a witch casts magic spells to bedevil the Nazis. It’s AWESOME.

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I stand beside you. 10,000 Percent. A shockingly sophisticated WWII Yarn and Family Picture. It’s #361 on my Best Ever List. Angela Lansbury steals the film and the songs are a delight.

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It doesn’t hold a candle to Mary Poppins, which is its main problem. If it weren’t for that, it’d be fine.

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I haven’t seen it since I was 12 in 1971. Sounds like I should give it another look.

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I remember seeing Bedknobs & Broomsticks in the theater when it came out. My earliest movie memory.

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I rate Mary Poppins (1964) just above it. Poppins is the blueprint of this type of film. It is iconic and lasts in our culture. Bedknobs and Broomsticks (1971) suffers if you expect it to be that first Poppins experience. If you go in not knowing what to expect, it might surprise you. Having watched both over the years, they each age gracefully and the gap between the two is not as large as it was. On my Best Ever, Poppins is #360 and Bedknobs #361. They essentially are comparable in my opinion. Particularaly if watched several times. Poppins has the x factor, the innovation, and Julie Andrews. Bedknobs sneaks up on you. Angela, The Sherman Brothers, the Animation. It pulls a similar spell. Perhaps not as powerful but closer than you think. To me anyway.

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We’re talking apples to oranges here.

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They are both Disney Productions, directed by Robert Stevenson, with music written by the Sherman Brothers, and written and produced by Bill Walsh. They are sibling films as I see it.

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More like Red Delicious to Honey Crisp.

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I recently watched this film, which I hadn’t seen since I was a kid, and really enjoyed it. I don’t know why I loved it so much as a kid, because I couldn’t possibly have understood the nuance or the spirituality of the film, but it was absolutely wonderful. The scene where he runs naked with the caribou (in a Disney film no less!) was absolutely astounding.

Supposedly based on a true story, although the autobiographer also said he never let the truth get in the way of a true story.

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Never Cry Wolf is one of my favorite movies. The director, Caroll Ballard, used to be a cinematographer and it shows in all of his films (The Black Stallion, Fly Away Home). Most of his films are about the relationship between humans and animals, and they’re all lovely things.

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I’m going to have to watch The Black Stallion again soon, because I also remember loving that as a kid but I remember almost nothing about it.

Pretty much the only thing I remembered about Never Cry Wolf before I watched it again was the scene where he falls through the ice, and that’s relatively near the beginning of the movie. But it did freak me out back then, so that’s probably why.

Disney used to make a lot of live action adaptations of family-friendly books. I wish they still did.

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Of course, I would be remiss if I didn’t mention my favorite Disney film, which would be:

As far as favorite animated film, despite admitting the first half isn’t great, once Donald gets to Brazil it’s almost all good (apart from the Christmas part they didn’t bother to animate for some reason).

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And while I’m on the subject of live action Disney films, I would say these two are the most highly underrated:

I don’t understand why either of them flopped. I really don’t

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We watched Return to Oz on tv last week. I’ve always wondered why it isn’t remembered more fondly. It’s a bit dark for Oz, but that’s hardly unique to this movie.

I’m not a huge Disney fan, but there’s a lot of good stuff in their catalogue. Alice in Wonderland is one of my favorites, but also put me down for an anytime viewing of Mary Poppins or Bedknobs and Broomsticks. I’ve also got a soft spot for the largely forgotten Great Mouse Detective, because how can you not love Vincent Price living it up as a cartoon rat mouse?

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It’s super dark. I know a lot of people who it terrified as kids, especially the Wheelers.

Disney had that brief phase in the 1980s where they were making movies that were still kid-friendly, but not bright and cheery. Return to Oz, Tron, The Black Cauldron, The Black Hole, The Watcher in the Woods, Something Wicked This Way Comes, etc.

Just thought of another Disney flop that isn’t dark, but I still love it.

It has 100% more Deezen than other Disney movies.

(Plus Paul Reubens in a tiny, but appropriate, role.)

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