Historic Landmarks

You shall not crush my dreams.

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The Landmark Theatre in downtown Syracuse, originally the Loew’s State Theater, built in 1928. The first of their “oriental” movie palaces, predating those in NYC. The very best and trippiest place to see a show, the whole room just sounds so good.
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Yes, yes, but has anyone been to the Dakota site we’re all really interested in, Wall Drug?

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funny you should ask!

hey look it’s mt rushmore

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Kings Mountain National Military Park, about 20 miles from friend @RVR2 .

From below


You can’t see much these days looking up the mountain. I almost didn’t include this, but it’s the view from the above placard.

On the top





Note the name Benjamin Cleveland, both on the placard and the monument.
He had his horse shot out from under him, so he seized the British commander’s mount. This is him after the battle.

Benjamin Cleveland is my 6G Grandfather.

And because the theme of the day seems to be “complications”, he was a slave holder, about 20 or so, who worked his fields.

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DAMN!!! I was waiting to say that!!!

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Field of Dreams house Dyersville, IA

Nashville’s Parthenon, which contains the statue of Athena, the world’s largest statue in the Western Hemisphere. These were taken the day of the Rifftrax Live Amityville Show!


Graceland


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Erm…no man can say?

Zing!

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“JIMMY!!! ON THE MARCH!!!”

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I have a feeling Kane riffs will haunt this thread.

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Hoyt Sherman Place in Des Moines:

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The Embassy Theatre in Fort Wayne, Indiana. It was originally a silent movie theater in the 20s. It still has the original organ.




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I was totally floored one day when my former landlady casually mentioned that her husband’s sister wrote the book Farewell to Manzanar. I regret that I never knew him well enough for me to be able to ask him about that. I pretty much only saw him when he had to come over to the apartments to fix or replace something.

But that apartment I rented from her was just a block away from San Jose’s Japantown area and this historic building –

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Built in 1910 as the Kuwabara Hospital, this building was originally named for its first resident physician, Dr. Taisuke Kuwabara. Language and religious differences in the early 1900s made it difficult to establish communication and trust between the Japanese Issei and local San Jose doctors, so this hospital was built to entice Dr. Kuwabara to move his practice to Japantown. However, since Japanese doctors could not be legally licensed in the state of California, Dr. Kuwabara’s presence did not fully alleviate this problem. A local doctor, Dr. James Beattie, had to supervise Dr. Kuwabara (and those who later replaced him), perform all surgeries, and even held title to the hospital.

San Jose’s biggest historical attraction is of course, the Winchester Mystery House, a mere bungalow compared to Hearst Castle.

I think I took the tour there 4 times, since whenever my siblings visited that was one place they each wanted to see. It’s worth the trip.

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FOUR times? That’s a lot of walking! :smile:

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Went there with my sister’s granddaughters.

I was trying to get them into Doctor Who, and we had recently watched Blink (it being a stand alone episode that didn’t need a lot of (or any) back story).

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Well, the visits & tours were spread out over a few years in the 1980s & 90s, so each time it was still kind of interesting for me. Plus, can one ever tire of the mystery and majesty of “The Door to Nowhere”?

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Pretty self-centered of them to label the entire outdoors as “nowhere” :face_with_monocle:

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Rochester NY’s Auditorium Theatre, part of a huge old 1920s Masonic complex that looks like a frickin armory.



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How about Ole Faithfull?!?

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Who can identify THIS historic home?

Answer

That’s right, it’s the home Pearl’s Mint lived in as a baby!

But seriously though, here’s an actual historical place I’ve been to: Salem, Massachusetts


This menacing fellow is Roger Conant, founder of Salem


He overlooks the Salem Witch Museum, which has a very informative tour that dispels many myths about the witch trials (for example, victims were not burned, but usually hanged or even more unpleasantly, slowly crushed under a board loaded with stones. Fun and education for the whole family)

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