Home Improvement Projects or Other Projects Around Your Place

I bought my house back in 1996. It was built in 1938 and there’s been one project after another I’ve had done or done myself to make it better or more modern.
Since I bought my house I’ve had a 2 new roofs, new windows installed, insulation put in the attic and walls, new HVAC system, a carport, along with rebuilding my kitchen and bathroom back in 2004, a concrete driveway, outdoor fireplace, stone patio, a 3rd bedroom 2nd bathroom addition onto my home back in 2009, built a 600 sq ft ‘Mega Shed’ on my next door property back in 2011 that was converted into a Tiny Home/man-cave/she-shed completely furnished with plumbing, electrical, insulation, washer, dryer, full tiled bathroom, and a lot more I haven’t mentioned…
Suffice to say my entire property has had a make over in the last 26 years and I’m still not done. Currently redoing my kitchen floor tile and staining my back deck because I had the deck boards replaced back in February this year due to rot. Also screened in my front porch and installed a screen door last week which I am now staining.
Yeah I’ve done a lot of work over the years to my place and though it may seem exhausting and time consuming as well as a financial burden, the rewards are worth it. :sunglasses:

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Our next house project actually kicks off today. We are expanding our solar array (kicking it up to 5.5 KwH), plus adding in a Tesla Powerwall battery backup and a SPAN electrical panel

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Better watch out. This thread might be merged with the mundane non-mst3k tasks thread. Trends being what they are. :roll_eyes:

Home improvements are fun to do but you better watch out. Once you tighten a single loose screw that’s been bothering you, all the other screws in the house suddenly appear to also be loose. :sweat_smile:

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We’ve had to lay out $3000 so far this year on home repairs (insurance has helped). We had to get trees down- which the contractors did but then left all the wood behind. A branch went through our roof and that cost $1000 to fix and then we had a leaky pipe under the house and a broken sump pump, so there was a good six inches of water in the crawlspace. On top of that, our fence broke and the dog escaped. Thankfully, we could fix that one ourselves.

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I’m in the middle of prepping for having all my windows replaced (plus two doors). It’s the biggest home improvement project I’ve ever done on this house (I don’t count the extensive repairs I had to have done when the pipes in my upstairs bathroom burst about seven years ago because home insurance took care of most of that). Aside from that though, I’ve had solar installed and replaced both HVAC systems, and I’m considering replacing the hot water heater with a more efficient one (the current one is fifteen years old, so it’s about time for that). I’m currently applying for a HELOC to be able to cover the costs of the windows (and paying off my credit card), which will run to about $38,000 total.

That aside, I have a lot that I’d like to do to continue to improve the house for when I eventually sell it (which I’m sure I will do). I’d like to completely remodel the master bath to make the shower bigger and the room itself about a foot smaller (plus get rid of all the godawful WHITE in the room; it looks so sterile and cold I could cry), I want to finish the basement, and I’d like to build a sunroom on the back of the house. I don’t know if I’m going to get to any of those besides the bathroom before I sell the house, but I’d like to try. I’ve been in this house for ten years so far, so it’s about time I do some home improvement work. The more I do, the more I can theoretically sell the house for.

ETA: I should add, the credit card payoff is separate from the windows; the windows are $38,000, the card is approaching $28,000 right now. Thankfully the HELOC is for $95,000 so it’ll more than cover that, and I’m thinking I may go ahead and use some of it for the hot water heater because those only run about two grand at the high end.

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I had to replace my 24 year old natural gas hot water heater in the attic over 2 years ago. When I redid my kitchen I had an attic door installed not realizing that this would become a problem when it came time to replace the hot water heater as it had to be dented up to make it fit through the attic door :open_mouth:
The Rheem replacement was skinnier and over a foot taller in height which caused my roof vent pipe to look like a beacon on top of my house.

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GF and I are almost ready to close on a house. We both love craftsman-style homes, and we lucked into a 1925 Chicago-style (non-brick) bungalow - it’s still got the oak floors and trim (unpainted, phew), but the porch has been glassed in, the chimney needs repointing, and it needs a new roof soon. And a million other things. We’re excited.

This is it (yawwwwn):

And we want to turn it back into:

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I noticed a wall plug in the kitchen was pulling when I unplugged the air fryer last night to plug the Kettle in.

Grabbed a screw driver and took the cover off to see what was happening. The top screw had completely stripped it’s hole. due to the location of the plug and the way it was originally installed in the 50’s, (the outlet itself was updated with the rest of the house before we moved in) but led to 30 minutes of frustration finding a way to secure it back in place.

We had plans since moving in 8 years back to update (possible expand) the kitchen. That just made me more inclined to make that a reality.

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Oh this is a whole thing for me :smile: Our house was built in 1928, added on to some time in the late 50’s/early 60’s, and again in the 80’s. We’ve gutted and rebuilt the living room, dining room, kitchen, and master bathroom. We also rebuilt the downstairs 3/4 bathroom after we tried to get a permit for some minor work and the building dept figured out that the whole downstairs unit was unpermitted. (We knew that, it was in the disclosures when we bought it.)

Most of that stuff we paid professionals to do, though I did tile the floor of the tiny downstairs bathroom myself, and now I know how to replace a toilet.

Kitchen before and after!

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How hard was it to install the dog?

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Yeah the building next door was permitted to be a big storage building,. Only after that permit was closed out did I go in and furnish it into a ‘tiny house’ :sunglasses:
The city should stay out of our home project business!

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Surprisingly easy*, the shelter just GAVE her to us

*Easy of installation may not be indicative of ease of operation. Dog subject to separation anxiety and fits of rage at the existence of other dogs. Do not install German Shorthaired Pointer near squirrels, cats, rabbits, or other small animals. Your mileage may vary.

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My sister converted her garage into a man cave, complete with built-in shelving across the entire wall that has the garage door in it.

Her: Permits? We don’t need no stinkin’ permits!

(She’s since sold the house and now it’s the new owners’ problem.)

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I probably won’t ever sell my house so I shouldn’t have to worry about that :grin:

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Every GSP I’ve ever met has been exceptionally smart. Also very farty.

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She was smart but not too farty. We’ve gotten lucky in the farty dog department, considering we’ve also had a American Bulldog and two mastiffs. The current one doesn’t fart much but when he does, HOLY COW.

Just to get back on topic, I do have one DIY project that I already showed off on the Pandemic Projects thread…

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This afternoon, my non-farty dog farted and it scared her and she ran away.

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Wow and I thought the before picture was lovely! You turned it into a masterpiece

I’m getting ready to move into a new place in a couple months that was built in the 20s. There’s a few projects that need to be done, it’s livable now but I’d rather do the work before I move in. The bathroom especially will be a project because there’s not a lot of air circulation in there (no fan) so the ceiling paint is all peeling, and all the paint on the walls is old and cracked/peeling. Worst of it is, the walls are half tile, which somebody painted over, so before I can repaint I’ll have to strip it. Carefully, because I don’t know how long ago the paint was put up and whether the tile underneath is original or not. :smiling_face_with_tear:

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While I am super impressed with everything in this thread, it only reinforces my determination to not be a homeowner for the foreseeable future. I’m doing good just keeping an apartment running with some form of coherency…and I love being able to just call maintenance to replace or fix something.

AC blow out? Call maintenance. Toilet seat need replacing? Call maintenance. Strange dripping noise in the boiler closet? Call maintenance.

(Though I am proud of the time I installed a ceiling fan by myself. Took 6 different screwdrivers and my shoulders hurt for a week, but I did it!)

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I see where you’re coming from, but our mortgage is half of what our rent was. We have so much more money.

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