I have Q's...who has A's?

  1. Why is there a time limit on how long the campaign stays open? Why couldn’t they extend the time we are able to donate?

  2. If you were given the choice of letting them keepthe donation you gave this time, without a reward, would you? Then having a new campaign where we can donate again for the reward?

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  1. I think the time table is set by whichever company is hosting the fundraising. Kickstarter was 90 days, now it’s 60 days as the limit.

  2. Good question. I think it would depend on my personal situation at the time. I would probably donate less, but maybe more often?

  1. Do you think if we had those additional 30 days we could have gotten there?

  2. I agree. It also would depend on how much I gave the first time. The way I feel right now, Id be willing to have them keep my donation, then start again. Why would we have to wait until next year to start again?

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  1. I think a time limit allows them to plan their work. Presumably if it stays open indefinitely, prices go up and the original goal would need to be raised.

  2. No, I wouldn’t want my money tied up like that. There are other causes and projects I can donate to while I wait for Gizmonics to regroup and try again.

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I’m not a crowdfunding expert, but generally speaking, these campaigns have time limits for a few reasons. A big one is the urgency, even if that urgency is artificial. If a campaign is more or less open “until we get enough,” it’s less exciting, you can come back and donate whenever, I’ll tell my friends later, etc. That excitement and urgency are motivators.

Another reason is payment timing - people pledge, knowing that the money will be collected at a certain date, assuming the goal is hit. For many people, that’s part of the calculation of what or if they can contribute. If you extend a campaign, you change that billing date. People manage money differently, and a change of billing date could be a problem for some folks, or cause others to cancel pledges.

I tend to think of these things as contacts. You collectively pledge enough, by date X, and we will (best effort) produce a thing and/or rewards. As a potential backer, all those terms come into play when you make your decision. Do I want to back, and can I? Do I think the campaign will succeed? Is the potential outcome worth it? That campaign end date factors into several places.

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  1. The time table gives both the production company ability to plan for a start of production and the donors to know when their pledges will be collected.

They can’t just extend the pledge drive in my opinion because it is a breech of contract. We pledged under the plan that if it was successful we would be charged on a particular date.

If they extended it, I would have wanted my pledge cancelled. There wasn’t enough demand and I don’t want to barely make the cutoff for 3 episodes on my pledge. I feel like $200/episode is too much given the little effort the campaign seemed to put behind this effort.

  1. I would not give them my money for nothing. I love the show. But I would rather just buy some of the episodes to download to update low quality versions of my collection. I’ve already done that, and don’t really know why none of that money seemed to make its way to their coffers for a new episode.
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  1. No. I think the 2.7M they got was the majority of what they were going to get. I think getting another million wouldn’t have happened over an additional 2 months.

  2. We need to wait because demand is not high enough. I personally think they need to do something to increase demand.

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  1. No idea about the time limits of fundraiser websites. But will say this, really think they need to pick a better time window than between Thanksgiving and Black Friday Christmas sales. If it were me I’d set it up in late April after people get their tax refund checks.

  2. Me personally yes, mainly because if I pledged it, should have responsiblity towards living up to it. With that being said, it would make accounting really interesting if all of a sudden, four or five months down the road, Joel wakes up and decided he’ll take the money after all.

(Edit: As a footnote, just took the pledge money they didn’t collect and put it towards a season pass at the Gizmoplex. The “New stepdad alert” riff from “Dr. Morbid” was frickin’ awesome.)

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Someone already mock-proposed that he’s in deep to the mob because the Packers keep losing. I forget which thread. But that would make a great College Humor sketch. If College Humor is still around. I haven’t looked.

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Other people have answered 1, but for #2 sure. All I really want is more episodes, and more of that stuff that new episodes bring – like live watchalongs and new conversations on this here board. And I’d 100% give them money now even if they said “we’ll be back in four years with new stuff!”

The rewards are kind of a moral hazard for me, because I would just give them money, but then I’m cheap enough that I start thinking “well if I’m giving them money anyway I might as well get some merch…” and that’s how I have like fifteen MST3K tshirts

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I also doubt if someone that pledged $5000 for set tour and in person classes would have made the same pledge with the only reward being 3 episodes of the show.

When I think of the question #2, it’s hard for me to think about it in terms of an incomplete season. But we were nearly $5,000,000 still to go on a 12 episode season.

Edit: even when I think of how “close” we were to success, it was only for a partial season.

Once you get to 25 shirts it’s time to make a quilt. This is fandom law.

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They’re calling themselves Dropout now, but the entity still exists.

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