Mad Magazine

I was thinking of Mad this morning and decided to look up its Wikipedia page and came across this quote:

Without Mad Magazine, MST3K would have been slightly different, like for instance, it wouldn’t have existed.

– Frank Conniff

I had a much older brother who himself was not only a Mad reader, but a vintage Mad collector, so I had issues going back to about 1960.

My favorite Mad artist was definitely Don Martin.

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But I loved Al Jaffee’s weird inventions and fold-ins almost as much. And, of course Snappy Answers to Stupid Questions.

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And then there was Sergio Aragones and his column doodles.

I also had an issue with a record that I probably annoyed my parents with by listening to all the time.

So let’s discuss all things Mad! Were you a Mad reader? Do you have fond memories?

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Spy vs. Spy was my favorite.

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I forgot about Spy vs. Spy when I was posting. Definitely something to look forward to every issue.

There was also occasionally Spy vs. Spy vs. Spy.

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I was a second-generation Mad fan. My dad had a bunch of the paperbacks from the 50s and 60s, going back to when EC Comics published it.

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I used to read Mad Magazine in the early 80s as a youngster. To this day, I’m still amused as hell that our elementary school library carried it.

Although the game itself was flawed, the Spy Vs. Spy NES game tried something different at the very least.

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Joel referenced Bugs Bunny cartoons.

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I was a fan of Mad in the '70s, and had that Alfred E. Newman for President poster on my wall as a kid. I wish I had kept the issues I had, especially now that Mad is no longer being published. Spy vs. Spy was probably my favorite, but I was a fan of Sergio Aragones panels as well, they were often kind of a warped Family Circle. I didn’t like Family Circle, I didn’t get it because I was a kid, but I got what Sergio was doing, and loved it.

Of course, Don Martin was the mainstay of Mad, it owed so much of its style to his artwork during that time. I also just watched The Girl in Lovers Lane MST3k episode last night, with the Doc Martens/ Don Martin boots segment. It definitely shows that connection between MST and Mad.

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mst3k509invention

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That’s definitely an influence too, but you can probably trace a line from Mad’s movie parodies to MST3K. They’re sort of proto-riffing a movie.

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The movie parodies were definitely a direct influence. They were always a mixed bag for me, as they were often sending up movies I had not seen. MST3K did just about come full circle on that, however, with the MST3K comics.

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@TheHippy

You save ‘movies you haven’t seen’ to read after The Lighter Side Of… :stuck_out_tongue_winking_eye: I always read it from best to blecch, anyway.

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You could definitely say Mad’s movie and TV show parodies influenced riffing… except in Mad the characters riffed themselves.

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mst3k mad

And MST3K would be represented in Mad Magazine itself, as it was with their take on Apollo 13.

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That is awesome, I had no idea MST made an appearance in Mad.

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I spent hundreds of hours playing the sequel on either my C64 or Amiga500 (can’t remember which–perhaps both).

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You hit on all of my favorite things about Mad Magazine - Don Martin, snappy answers, and Aragones doodles. The tv show/movie parodies were also great.

In the mid 80’s, one issue had a Mad computer program. They gave the Basic code for various computer systems to have Alfred E. Neuman on your computer screen. I had a Commodore and was going to try it, until I saw how much typing was involved. It didn’t seem worth it just to see his image. Plus, that would have been time away from playing Ultima III: Exodus. I think the next couple of Mad Magazines has corrections for the programming, so I was kind of happy I didn’t attempt it and it not work.

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i had a subscription as a kid, i loved it all but i think the fold ins were my favorite

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Major MAD fan here, too. I was being a spoiled brat child in 1970 wanting a comic book really bad. My grandfather pointed out this magazine with Snoopy on the cover (I had a lot of Peanuts paperbacks), but it wasn’t a comic, so no dice. By '72 I was checking small books and came across a collection of comic book stories including one called “Poopeye”. The idea of an alternate universe version of a favorite cartoon was fascinating, so I bought it - my 1st MAD. Got many collections like that since, plus a MAD Special for a under the tree on Christmas 1973. Didn’t get my 1st regular issue till winter-spring '74.

Favorites: Mort Drucker’s my favorite artist (as you can see from my MST3K fan art in that section), enjoyed the Don Martin and Spy vs. Spy pages. Loved the “chicken fat” (hidden gags). But the part of MAD with the most influence on me is the “made up” words throughout, esp. the classics (potrzebie, axolotl, furshluginner, osszefogva, etc.) Adds surreal quality. Finding out the sources of them is fun. Contrary to my opinion of its source, I’ve always thought “covfefe” would’ve made a great MAD nonsense word.

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Yeah, I remember unwrapping a copy of Sergio Aragones on Parade one Christmas morning. Oversized glossy trade paperback. I still have it somewhere.

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