Used To Have / Now Have

Oh man, we thought Zip drives were the bee’s knees with 100meg. and then there was the Jazz that held a whole gig!

3 Likes

But sometimes the Zip drive would make the Stapler of Death sound :grimacing:, failing to read the disk, despite careful storage in the plastic snap case between uses.

7 Likes

Ye gods, I remember that now! The staccato death-rattle of all your data.

3 Likes

The Great Obsolete Gear Purge finally happened a few years ago when I moved to NC after 25 years in TN: two Syquest drives, a Jaz drive, two working Zip drives, a couple of boxes of disks … a PowerTower Pro 225. (There was a LOT of old gear in that closet.)

2 Likes

Right now, I’m thanking my lucky stars that I didn’t go all in on Zip disks way back in the day.

2 Likes

I used cassette tape storage on the TI/99-4A, as well as the C64 until I got my first floppy drive for that. The drive cost as much as the computer.

Speaking of those days of yore, who else remembers type-in programs? Those programs included in magazines that you typed into your computer by hand.

11 Likes

I used to get Enter magazine which was a computer magazine for kids put out by the Children’s Television Workshop and they always had type-in programs. I spent hours typing them in. The result didn’t always work because you’d miss a 5 or something.

8 Likes

My earliest recollection of programming (as it applied to me … my dad was in systems from the early '60s on) was a type-in version of Battleship for a TI calculator. The excitement!

2 Likes

I subscribed to Run magazine (and some other C64/BASIC magazine before that I think), and I always looked forward to the programs that I had to type in. I distinctly remember one that was a aquarium with tropical fish.

Edit: Found it! Run magazine Nov. 1989.


(there were two additional pages of code after that one)

5 Likes

Oh yes! pages and pages of numbers. Spend days inputting all of it … and then it didn’t work. So you had to go back through all of those pages looking for the transposed numbers. (or was that just me?)

6 Likes

It was not just you. I would input the code, then I would do things like add graphics to it or sound effects. But I look back on those listings now and go, “Wow, there’s literally no attempt to make it readable.”

'course, there really couldn’t be, but still. It amazes me I learned to code from it.

3 Likes

Yup, I remember shopping for a cassette player/recorder as a data drive for my Timex/Sinclair 1000 (which I still have, and which still works, and I think I probably still have a stack of Sync magazines around in deep storage). And entering Z80A machine code in hex in a ‘1 REM …’ statement…

3 Likes

I will love that forever for Hunt the Wumpus alone.

5 Likes

Same! I loved that game so much I remade it. Don’t think the online Java version works anymore, but the downloadable Java version should.

5 Likes

:smiley:

A gentleman and a scholar, @SandyFrank. Much respect.

4 Likes

I’m pretty sure I never used a TI/99-4A, but I’ve definitely played Hunt the Wumpus before. Was it on other systems?

2 Likes

The Wikipedia entry for Hunt the Wumpus tells me that versions of the game were made for a number of other systems, so it looks like it made the rounds elsewhere.

2 Likes

The original Wumpus was a text-only mainframe game. It has existed in a number of forms on a number of platforms over the years, so you’ve probably encountered it at some point.

3 Likes

It was on any computer with a Basic interpreter. You could type it in yourself NOW!

https://www.atariarchives.org/morebasicgames/showpage.php?page=178

2 Likes

Used to have:

Now have:

Dang brand recognition…

4 Likes