Weirdest movie ending

Eli Roth said they’re focus-grouping scripts now. :roll_eyes:

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Oh, boo-minus. That’s just pitiful.

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Egad. Discourse does not have the correct emoji reaction for this.

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I didn’t think they even had scripts anymore. Just a series of cocktail napkins that some poor intern has to turn into a shooting script at the last minute.

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Pretty funny reference to Buckaroo Banzai in last nights Bob’s Burgers.

They know.

THEY KNOW…

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The guy who wrote an even stranger ending, namely Rock and Roll Nightmare, must envy that ending

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I haven’t seen last night’s Animation Domination yet. I was too busy trying to get Beyond Thunderdome Atlantis.

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Wait. I thought Spaceballs WAS Jews In Space…? :person_shrugging:

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It doesn’t have a snowglobe emoji, either. SO wrong. :angry:

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The tragedy is that would almost certainly result in more creativity than the focus-group-every-frame crap we get now.

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I love those end titles.

My two favorites are in (somewhat) serious art cinema:

Jean-Luc Godard’s Week-End has an end title card that says “Fin du cinemá” which…mood. That would fit right in at the end of “Things” or “Manos”…or even “Beyond Atlantis” for all I care :rofl:

Also, G.W. Pabst’s Westfront 1918 (1930) has an end card that simply says “Ende?!” in scratched letters and a really abrupt musical stinger. It’s prophetic, knowing what would happen to Germany and the world in just a few short years.

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So, uh… correct me if I’m remembering wrong. But didn’t the original film end with Seymour sacrificing himself to save original Audrey? So the original didn’t end totally upbeat, but it was still less bleak than the ending of the stage musical. :thinking:

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That is not correct. Seymour is being pursued by the angry villagers (Skid Row residents count as angry villagers, I think) and eludes them, making his way back to Mushnick’s where he decides to kill Audrey Jr by grabbing a kitchen knife and climbing inside it, promptly being eaten.

Which is less bleak, I suppose than complete domination of the world by carnivorous space plants.

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In the original Little Shop of Horrors, Seymour intentionally wrecks his relationship with Audrey so as to protect her from the killer plant, Audrey Junior. He then takes a stand against Junior, but Junior hypnotizes Seymour into doing his bidding and bring him more victims, such as a streetwalker.

During a publicity event at the plant shop, Junior’s buds open up, revealing the faces of all of its victims. Seymour is thus identified as the killer and tries to flee, but not before unsuccessfully attempting to murder Junior. He ultimately becomes Junior’s final victim, which is shown in a reveal shot as one of the dying Junior’s buds opens for the last time to reveal Seymour’s face.

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Less musically awesome, anyways, because the musical Little Shop of Horrors film’s deleted “Don’t Feed the Plants” is a GREAT song, and is actually genuinely chilling. Another reason among many as to why they never should have changed that original ending.

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I got to see the original run of the musical off-Broadway. I loved it. Which is probably why I couldn’t hold on to whatever happened in the original ending. It just didn’t have the same oomph.

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Yeah, I’m gonna have to say that I’m jealous. Glad you got to experience that!

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Back to this, if we’re talking weird movie endings, you have to give a mention of the Nicolas Cage movie Knowing.

There’s nothing in the trailer that could possibly point to the arrival of the aliens who relocate the two kids to a new planet before toasting Earth with a solar flare.

You show me someone who tells you that they predicted the ending to Knowing, and I’ll show you a liar.

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I just remembered the movie has a really stereotypical, flamboyantly gay character and some homophobia about them, so beware of that if you decide to see Tammy and the T-Rex.

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I mean, you don’t have to talk ME into an extra Howard Ashman song.

From an artistic standpoint, no. From a box office standpoint? Yeah, probably. Nobody wants to see Rick Moranis get eaten by a carnivorous plant.

The 1960 LSoH is a minor miracle in a lot of ways: It’s funnier and more lively than a lot of big budget flicks that weren’t mostly shot in 2 days on a $28K budget. And when I first saw it on TV when I was, like, five (it was a favorite of my father’s) that ending really freaked me out.

But, yeah, on a re-view it seems like the kind of anti-climax that, while it suits the farcical nature of the movie, is rather unsatisfying.

Joe Bob hosted it on “The Last Drive-In” last season, and this season he did Black Sunday, which was partly responsible for LSoH achieving its cult status. Because for a second feature, it’s quite good.

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