Yuma

Any thoughts on this Arizona city? We’re considering moving our family from the Midwest to there for the sunshine. We would love any perspective from like-minded MSTies!

And, slightly ON topic, I know a lot of westerns have been shot around the Grand Canyon State but do any MST3K episodes have any connections to the area?

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I hear you can take the 3:10 to there.

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The remake is one of my favorites!

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If you like to talk about dry heat and being in the middle of nowhere while melting into the pavement at midnight, it’s a great place to live.

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Thoughts? Um, be ever watchful for the Beast of Yuma Flats?

sorry, I have nothing serious to contribute, never been to Arizona

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One of my brothers was there about 30 years ago and my dad was there about 60 years ago. Alas, I don’t think it’s anything like it was back then. :slight_smile:

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I don’t know what it would be like to live there full time, but I hear a lot of people head down there during the winter months. A coworker of mine does this. He goes down there on our week off every month in the winter.

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My Aunt used to live there. I heard stories about a (at the time) rich border culture, pervasive xeriscaping, and an argument about teaching Spanish in schools (WTH?). It is indeed hot. Hot hot hot. A dry heat is very very tolerable if you have shade. I gather Yuma doesn’t have much shade.

I can tell you one thing with absolute certainty: it is a better place to live than Lubbock, Texas.

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Anywhere is better than Lubbock (except maybe Amarillo)

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Yuma will surprise you.

If the sun’s not too warm.

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I’ve only been there once, about ten years ago, so take this FWIW.

It seemed very small, and it’s not close to ANYTHING. The landscape is more or less wasteland for hours in every direction. But, it did have some nice scenery around the river. I was surprised that at the time it had two German restaurants, but sadly I think they’re both gone.

My personal opinion is that Arizona is unfit for human habitation, and it’s going to get much worse in the next 30 years. But I have family in Tucson who disagree, so :woman_shrugging:

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Hoyt Axton was never to Arizona, either, but he was born in Oklahoma (or so they told him). And he wrote the music to Mitchell. Is that enough of a connection?

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Well, there’s always Midland-Odessa… which was the result of a Star Trek accident where one horrible Texas city got split into a puritanical aristocracy and a den of iniquity. I once saw Insane Clown Posse perform in a rodeo building in Odessa. 'Nuff said.

I lived in San Antonio for a few years, Lubbock and Amarillo were the signs we were almost out of Texas … After driving for twelve hours.

Was Kim Darby their leader?

Look up a guy named Nick Papagiorgio when you get there. He works in software and he doesn’t need corrective lenses.

Damn, that’s obscure… I spent ten minutes on the web trying to figure it out, and I’m stumped. Please explain joke for stupid person…

When I went across the country with my college buddies I passed out just after Amarillo and woke up a couple hours later and the landscape had gone from horrible to beautiful. I asked what happened, and was told we had passed into New Mexico.

In the first season of King of the Hill there was an episode whose B plot was Peggy driving to Lubbock to buy her giant shoes discretely. As in, the B plot was mostly just scenes of Peggy driving. And driving. And driving. I think it went overnight. And that was from Arlen, which is (supposedly) only about seven hours away. San Antonio to Lubbock is a haul, I’ve done it many times.

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She was the oldest kid in that one episode with all the kids on that planet with only kids and she was kind of their leader.

If you take the other highway, you can go across the top of Texas instead. It takes longer, but it doesn’t take as long.