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The Bluest Eye - Toni Morrison

The Bluest Eye tackles a lot of issues in a relatively short book. Morrison writes about race, gender, poverty, abuse, and self-hatred among other topics without heavy handedness or pointing directly at the problem and saying “look at that”. She just tells the story and the issues become self-evident through the telling. Far too much to discuss here, but one of the themes that stood out to me was how abuse and self-hatred are passed down through generations.

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Whew - it’s been decades since I read The Bluest Eye, but it hit me like a brick and I still think about it. For me personally, it made a bigger impact than Beloved.

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Rereading Arrhythmia, a comic I picked up recently with three plots:

  1. An accountant is given control of leftover recruits for a suspicious mission.
  2. A mercenary gets a job as bodyguard for the noblewoman he was supposed to leave alone.
  3. Some brat wrecks everybody else’s day, but in a charming way.

I particularly like the rather fluid way the three plots switch from one to another. (Ask me about the 24 other comics I have in my feed reader.)

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https://www.gutenberg.org/files/19141/19141-h/19141-h.htm

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What book is this?

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dumb dumb dumb by mary jo pehl

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If you were a kid in the '70s, you’ll likely get a kick out of this…

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A couple days ago I finished A Wizard’s Guide to Defensive Baking. It’s about Mona, who’s 14 and her only magical talent is the ability to command dough. I found it a great YA fantasy novel about finding your strength and making do with what you have. 4 out of 5.

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Trying to get into Ghost Story by Peter Straub after hearing great things about it for decades.

So far I am having a lot of trouble getting into it. Maybe starting your book with page after page of nothing happening isn’t the greatest choice?

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Meh. A week or two ago I had went on a phrase-length mini-rant against one UG coworker who was griping about “ZOMG ‘Calc IV’!'.” To which I rejoindered “vector calculus will rule your world!”

Something like that, anyway. I give the abbreviated exchange.

Whatever. And then I overheard him griping about “meh meh pew pew, why do I need to know linear algebra if I am computer science.” Idiot.

But, I had the good idea to brush up on partial derivatives, tensors and stuff just now. Yes, it’s an old book, a Schaum’s Outline, but it’s still fine!

Really? CS would-be student doesn’t see freaking linear algebra as fundamental? Must have had fun flunking out of discrete mathematics, that tool. Not to mention applications.

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Going through this…again ! I love all the stories, and the writing style is so good as to be theft worthy.

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HEY!!! Book people!!!

Should one read The Magnificent Ambersons…you know, the novel…or is the movie enough?

I must know.

Running water, upstairs and down!

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TBH, I’ve never used linear algebra in a lifetime of computer work. Except occasionally for fun.

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I haven’t read that one. I’ve actually got a question for anyone who’s read Robinson Crusoe.
There’s a small passage where Crusoe talks about working on his “mechanics” or some such term, anyone remember this from the book?

Anyhow, I actually found a real crazy, blatant editing mistake in Strassler’s Landmark Herodotus…he identifies a horse as a camel in a black and white photo…

“That’s not a camel, that’s a horse’s ass !” (Takes one to know one).

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Well, that’s a good find, and thank you very little for making me get down my old copy and flip through.

Where is this bad deed, anyway?

I see horse and Strassler says horse.

Anyway, good find! I haven’t thought about this one in ages. So, good to dip into again.

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Four places (thanks Gutenberg!):

the labour and sufferings of the mechanic part of mankind

every man may be, in time, master of every mechanic art.

was yet but a very sorry workman, though time and necessity made me a complete natural mechanic soon after

I improved myself in this time in all the mechanic exercises which my necessities put me upon applying myself to

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I would have thought τέχνη for “mechanics,” but Dafoe could be drawing from roughly contemporaneous ideas like a crude materialism or atomism, or equally something like in Descartes, viz., an automaton theory of primitive creatures.

Just WAGs.

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I think it’s like “working class”.

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Check figure 2.124A, it falls on page 173 on my copy.

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“A view of the Great Pyramid of Cheops…Note the camel with rider (lower left) which provides scale.”

If you look closely, you will see that it’s a horse, with two riders that is present in this picture !

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